Sunday, January 1, 2017

My Kids Think Graveyards Have Gift Shops

Maybe some of them do by now, for all I know. Out of sight, out of mind. That's the way I'd describe the culture of "stuff" and its relative absence in Alaska. It's not that my kids are immune from the temptations of stuff (far from it) or that there's NO stuff in Alaska. It's just that it's less in your face all the time, especially outside the larger communities on the road system, of which Juneau is not one.

So when my kids visit down south, they see a lot more stuff than they're used to seeing on a day-to-day basis, and They. Want. It. ALL.  Consumerism really is a drug. I remember as a kid salivating over the Easy Bake Oven and the Barbie Dream House and writing my mom lengthy missives that I would slip under her bedroom door to plead my case. So I can't really blame them.

And to be fair, the other thing there's not much of in Juneau is big public works projects like zoos and museums with sprawling gift shops, and there're only four graveyards, just one of which is conceivably big enough for a gift shop.

Really I shouldn't have been surprised then, when, on this visit to NYC, Paige wondered aloud if a gigantic cemetery visible from the Triboro bridge had a gift shop, and Isaac asked me the same question about Jimi Hendrix's grave site on a recent trip to Seattle.

Later that night (read: just now) I went online to the Jimi Hendrix Memorial website, because I am at the point--or perhaps we all are as a country--where it's not at all clear that there WOULDN'T be a gift shop in a cemetery. I couldn't find any evidence of a Jimi Hendrix Memorial gift shop, but I did find this "boast" from a cemetery in Atlanta, proving that my kids were right all along! Good news: if you can't make it to the cemetery (alive, presumably), you can always shop online!

Check it out:






1 comment:

  1. Wow. Shopping in cemeteries. No wonder folks are dying to get in there.

    Seriously, though. Consumerism is a grave situation.

    ReplyDelete